Prematurity

Preterm births occur among 11.4% of all live infant births in the US. Without steady weight gain, premature infants may experience lengthy hospitalizations, neurodevelopmental deficits, and hospital readmissions, which can increase the financial burden on the health care system and their families.1

With advanced perinatal care and technology, survival among infants born very preterm (<32 weeks gestation) has improved dramatically over the last several decades. However, adverse medical and neurodevelopmental outcomes for those born very preterm remains high, particularly at the lowest gestational ages.2 Healthcare professionals can recommend nutrient-enriched formulas to increase nutrition intake and to support continued development ensuring internal and external growth.

 

Related Education for Professionals

Implementing a Probiotics Feeding Protocol

In this video, Jeffrey Loughead, MD, FAAP, shares his experience from developing a probiotic program and protocol in the NICU.

The Microbiome and the Preterm Infant: Gut Immaturity and Dysbiosis

An infographic that outlines the risk of dysbiosis—the abnormal colonization or the imbalance of microbes—developing in the preterm infant’s immature gut, as well as the role the microbiome can play in promoting better health while lowering the risk for adverse health consequences.

Preterm Infant Clinical Growth Assessment: Growth Velocity

Dr Groh-Wargo discusses the critical steps in preterm infant clinical growth assessment to calculate growth velocity, assess catch-up growth, evaluate growth charts, and monitor for extrauterine growth restriction. She also reviews the new international growth standards for intrauterine growth of preterm infants developed by the INTERGROWTH-21st Project, and Z-scores for monitoring growth trajectories.

Related Clinical Research

SARS-CoV-2 Exposure from Healthcare Workers to Infants

This study evaluated the risk and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 transmission from positive healthcare workers to infants in the NICU and the postnatal ward.

Improved Outcomes in Preterm Infants Fed a Nonacidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial

A controlled study with the goal of comparing growth, feeding tolerance, and clinical and biochemical evaluations in human milk-fed preterm infants who received either an acidified or nonacidified liquid human milk fortifier.

Schanler RJ, Groh-Wargo SL, Barrett-Reis B, White RD, Ahmad KA, Oliver J, Baggs G, Williams L, Adamkin D. J Pediatr. 2018;202:31-37.e2.

Probiotics and Preterm Infants: A Position Paper by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition Committee (ESPGHAN) on Nutrition and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition Working Group for Probiotics and Prebiotics

This ESPGHAN probiotic meta-analysis paper identifies strains with high efficacy and addresses safety issues of probiotic supplementation to preterm infants, who have reduced immunological capacities and occasional indwelling catheters.

van den Akker C, van Goudoever JB, Shamir R, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2020;70(5):664-680. doi:10.1097/MPG.0000000000002655

Growth and Tolerance of Preterm Infants Fed a New Extensively Hydrolyzed Liquid Human Milk Fortifier

This study was a comparison of growth and tolerance in premature infants fed either standard powdered human milk fortifier (HMF) or a newly formulated concentrated liquid that contained extensively hydrolyzed protein.

Kim, JH, Chan, G, Schanler, R, Groh-Wargo, S, Bloom, B, Dimmit, R, Williams, L, Baggs, G, & Barrett-Reis, B (2015). Growth and Tolerance of Preterm Infants Fed a New Extensively Hydrolyzed Liquid Human Milk Fortifier. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 61(6), 665–671. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000001010

Related Nutrition Resources

Count on Similac® for Evidence-Based, Innovative Nutrition Products

An extensive portfolio of science-based nutrition products with clinical results aids nutrition-challenged and very low-birth-weight NICU infants.

Premature Infant Nutrition Infographic

A descriptive infographic of a preterm infant's catch-up growth essentials and their benefits.

Customizable Solutions for Individualized Outcomes

Flexible, science-based solutions to meet the needs of your patients with customizable solutions for individualized outcomes.

Product Solutions

Similac® NeoSure®

A 22 Cal/fl oz, nutrient-enriched* formula for babies who were born prematurely. Designed to be used as a preterm post-discharge formula.

* Increased protein, vitamins, and minerals compared to term infant formula.

Similac® Human Milk Fortifier Concentrated Liquid

Intended for premature and low-birth-weight infants as a nutritional supplement to add to human milk.

Similac® Human Milk Fortifier Hydrolyzed Protein Concentrated Liquid

Intended for premature and low-birth-weight infants as a nutritional supplement to add to human milk.

Similac® Human Milk Fortifier Powder

Intended for premature and low-birth-weight infants as a nutritional supplement to add to human milk.

Similac® Special Care® 20

A 20 Cal/fl oz., iron-fortified feeding for growing, low-birth-weight infants and premature infants.

Similac® Special Care® 24

A 24 Cal/fl oz., iron-fortified feeding for growing, low-birth-weight infants and premature infants.

Similac® Special Care® 24 High Protein

A 24 Cal /fl oz., iron-fortified feeding for growing, low-birth-weight infants and premature infants who may need extra protein to help support growth.

Similac® Special Care® 30

A 30 Cal/fl oz., iron-fortified feeding for growing, low-birth-weight infants and premature infants.

Connect With Your Patients

Similac® NeoSure® Patient Brochure

An overview of NeoSure products which are WIC-eligible.

 
NeoSure Mixing Instructions (English & Spanish versions)

Preparation instructions, visual and written, for mixing Similac NeoSure formula.

 

References: 1. Evereklian M et. al J Pediatr Nurs. May-Jun 2017;34:e10-e16. doi: 10.1016/j.pedn.2017.02.006. 2. Barfield WD Clin Perinatol. 2018 Sep;45(3):565-577. doi: 10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.007.